Civil War Records

John's Great Grandsons -

CSA & Union Soldiers

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Anderson Humphries (son of William II)

Virginia Infantry - 36th Regiment - Co. F

Charles Lee Humphries (Son of Jesse)

Virginia Infantry - 22nd Regiment - Co. B

Conscript

Charles King Humphries (Son of William II)

Virginia Infantry - 22nd Regiment - Co. D

Nancy Humphries Confederate Soldier Pension

Widow of Charles King Humphries

(Son of William II)

Davis Morton Humphries (Son of William II)

Virginia Infantry - 22nd Regiment - Co. D

Harvey Humphries (son of William II)

Virginia Infantry - 26th Battalion - Co. A

Conscript

Henry Harrison Humphries

(Son of William II)

Virginia Infantry - 27th Regiment - Co. C

Group A

Group B

Group C

Confederate Soldier Service Pension

 Henry Harrison Humphries

(Son of William II)

Samantha Humphries Confederate Soldier Pension

Widow of Henry Harrison Humphries

(Son of William II)

James Humphries (son of Henry II)

Indiana Infantry - 12th Regiment - Co. G

John Humphries (son of Henry II)

Indiana Infantry - 12th Regiment - Co. G

Joseph Humphries (Son of Jesse)

Virginia Infantry - 26th Battalion - Co. G

Logan Smith Humphries (son of Jesse)

Conscript

Taken by Militia to Camp Buckner April 27, 1862

Discharged by Medical Board May 11, 1862

Sampson Humphries (Son of William II)

Virginia Infantry - 22nd Regiment - Co. B

Conscript

William Allen Humphries (Son of Jesse)

Conscript

Taken Prisoner by Gen. Averill's Troops

Written by Louise Collins Perkins

In the War Between The States, as in every war, there were people who supported the other side. The South had its sympathizers in the North and the North had its loyalists in the South. Regardless of sentiment, war takes its toll on the innocent citizen. This war was no exception. Lives were lost, property destroyed and possessions were stolen. Your politics did not matter.

At the end of the war, an act was passed enabling the citizens in the states not in the rebellion to receive pensions for their services and reimbursement for their loss of property and goods. The Southerners who claimed loyalty to the Union demanded the same rights. Finally, on March 3, 1871 Congress appointed a three-man board to consider the claims of those persons who declared they were loyal Union people.

Some 22,298 cases were filed and a total of $60,25,150 was claimed. The qualifications were so rigid that only 7,092 claims were allowed. (See The Southern Claims Commission, University of California Press, 1955, Frank W. Llingbert) A total of 80 questions were asked each claimant and affidavits required from as many witnesses as possible to back up their claim. The questions ranged from the simple ones of name and place of birth to how you felt about the Battle of Bull Run and how you voted on Secession.

In Alleghany County, 20 claims were filed; Last names of those claimants were: Arrington, Beckner, Brown, Burk, Crizer, Harmon, Humphries, Hurley, Kelly, Kincaid, Lee McMann, Persinger, Stull and Tyree.

A typical claimant was Jesse Humphries of Rich Patch. The Commission made the following summary of Jesse's claim:

Jesse Humphries, the original claimant, died in August 1871 and had his claim prosecuted by his son and estate administrator, Charles L. They stated he was much molested by the rebels who took three horses, three head of cattle, corn and fodder from him without paying. He was arrested by the Confederate authorities on a charge of harboring deserters and was sent to Covington jail. From there he was sent to Wythe County as a prisoner and kept six weeks (along with Zebedee Persinger, William Persinger and Harrison Nicell). He was a member of the Methodist Church, North and for that was despised and marked as a radical. His son William, the oldest, went with the States and did not claim to have been loyal. Son Charles served five weeks in the Militia, furnishing a substitute whom he paid $1500. In January 1864, after Charles was again liable for military duty, he got detailed to work in the furnace for the rest of the war. Charles insisted he was loyal and only performed service for the union because he was forced. However, the Commission found that his aid and comfort extended to the end of the war and therefor to some extent voluntary, and that he did not adhere to the Union Cause. The other four heirs were found to be loyal. Jesse had claimed the following items were taken: one brown mare, valued at $200; one dun horse valued at $150; one bay horse valued at $200; two saddles at $15. each; two check lines at four dollars; 300 pounds pork at 12 1/2 cents per pound, $37.50; 10 bushels corn at $1.50 per bushel, $15 for a total of $636.50.

The Commission decided the horses were taken for Army use, the saddles, lines and pork were stolen and the corn was taken lawfully. They allowed a total of $380. Deducting $80 for the disloyal heirs, allowing one third for the widow and four sixths for the remaining four loyal heirs, the total amount paid was $280.

The affidavit of Jesse Humphries stated that his property was taken about the eighth of December 1863 by General Averill's troops while on a raid. Harvey Humphries, Charles L. Humphries, Samuel Willard, William Humphries, Logan Humphries, Richard Fridley and Janetta Fridley all testified to the loyalty of Jesse Humphries. They were considered respectable and credible witnesses. His widow, Eunice Simmons Humphries also gave an affidavit as to the loyalty of Jesse and their sons Charles L. and William Allen. Logan Smith, Jarrette C., Hugh Payne and daughter Almira V. were underage. Joseph died after being drafted. She also stated her father and family were loyal.

Other persons mentioned in the affidavit as being loyal Union people were Jacob Tingler, George M. Jamison, Samuel Byers, Charles G. Persinger, George W. Tingler, Charles Redman, Carper Persinger, John Crowder, Samuel Willard, Moulton Humphries, Harvey Humphries, William N. Fridley, Richard Fridley, Charles K. Humphries, George P. King, Anna Persinger and sons Charles A. and John, Isaac Fridley, Nash Persinger, John C. Smith, Nancy Persinger and Isaac Wolfe.

It should be kept in mind that while there were certainly many persons loyal to the Union, there were also many persons who claimed loyalty because they felt the government owed them something for their losses. Perhaps some of those claims were approved but the majority were disallowed. Proving your loyalty was not an easy thing to do and the resulting records are of great value to anyone doing family research.

Jesse and William Humphries’ Horses and Equipment were taken on Dec. 19th, 1863 by Gen. Averell’s Troops. (According to testimonies given in their Southern States Claims records.)

 

All through the night of December 15, Averell pushed his brigade hard, determined to reach Salem by the next morning. Despite the brief rests the men and horses had enjoyed during the day, the hard march to Salem over that last week had taxed them. 'The condition of the troops was bad,' Averell reported. 'Many horses were broken down, more lame, [and] some of the men were obliged to walk.'

As morning broke, the Union troopers were only four miles from Salem and could clearly hear trains in the distance. There they happened upon a group of Confederate soldiers who had ventured out seeking information about the reports of Federal troops. They now received that information firsthand. Averell questioned them individually in turn and learned that Maj. Gen. Fitzhugh Lee's Confederate cavalry had left Charlottesville two days earlier to intercept them. More important, Averell learned that a train containing troops to guard the railroad and supplies was expected to arrive in Salem at any minute. The Union general reacted to this news by sending an advance detachment of 350 men and two 3-inch guns galloping into Salem to seize the depot before the train arrived.

As ordered, the group dashed into Salem and set about feverishly preparing for the train's arrival. They first cut the telegraph lines, then tore up the railroad tracks near the depot, positioned one gun and took defensive positions. Within minutes the train, which was coming from Lynchburg, arrived loaded with Confederate troops. The Federals opened fire on it with the 3-inch gun. The first round missed, but a second shot went through the train diagonally. The engineer immediately stopped the train and began to back away. At that point, a third artillery round was fired at the train, which 'hastened its movements,' claimed Averell.

Shortly thereafter, around 10 a.m., Averell's main body arrived in the town and began destroying as much of the rail facilities and supplies as they could. Parties of men were sent four miles east and 12 miles west down the line, where they set fire to five bridges and damaged as much track as possible. Meanwhile, in Salem, the depots and supplies were set ablaze, and three cars, a water station and a turntable were destroyed. In addition, the telegraph lines were cut for about a half mile. As the depots burned, the supplies within were also destroyed. Averell's report of the damage put the destruction at 'two thousand barrels of flour, 10,000 bushels of wheat, 100,000 bushels of shelled corn, 50,000 bushels of oats, 2,000 barrels of meat, several cords of leather, 1,000 sacks of salt….' He also claimed a large amount of clothing and horse equipment was destroyed, along with 100 wagons and other miscellaneous items. The Confederate tally, however, claimed that only 148 barrels of flour, 150 bushels of wheat and 180 bushels of corn were destroyed.

At 4 p.m., Averell withdrew from Salem, having created as much mayhem as he could in six hours. His men had covered 80 miles in the last 30 hours, so Averell decided to stop seven miles from Salem and rest a few hours. As the men dismounted, it began to rain and the temperature began to drop rapidly. Both nature and the Confederate army were closing in.

Armed with the knowledge that Averell had attacked Salem, the Confederate forces in the region quickly moved to block his escape. Jones realized correctly that his best chance was to cut off Averell's escape routes and slow him down enough for converging superior forces to be brought to bear. Jackson's command was in the best probable position to perform the critical task of blocking the passages back to Federal territory, and on the 17th Jones ordered him to return to a position near Clifton Forge, about 15 miles northeast of Covington down Jackson's River, and await further orders. At first light that morning, Jackson took a position near Jackson's River Depot, where he could monitor a route through nearby Rich Patch and another through Clifton Forge, a few miles to the east. Jackson then sent out scouts toward Buchanan and Rich Patch. Detached from the Army of Northern Virginia, Major General Jubal Early had troops approaching Clifton Forge, but after receiving reports that Averell was returning to Salem, he diverted them to Buchanan.

Averell and his weary troopers' route now took them along the bottom of Craig's Creek, and the deluge of freezing rain that had begun on the 16th continued unabated, turning the creek into a swollen, churning torrent. The stream's meandering route forced the brigade to cross it again and again, as many as seven times in only 10 or 12 miles.

As the men led their mounts into the freezing water, the horses sank to midrib. Their riders soon found that the current was so fast they had to turn their horses upstream and make them straddle sideways across the water. If they failed to perform this tricky maneuver properly, the current striking the horse in the side would sweep both horse and rider into the torrent, and several men were drowned as a result. The icy temperature took its toll, and soon the soldiers' uniforms were frozen stiff and the horses were covered with icicles. After a few crossings, the horses began to balk and had to be whipped and spurred to force them back into the raging waters.

Ammunition became soaked and unusable. Averell began to fear that his command would be unable to fight effectively if they ran into Confederate resistance. Therefore, he kept the brigade moving throughout the 17th, into the night and on until sundown on the 18th, when they finally reached New Castle once again. His command was soaked, freezing cold, muddy and hungry. They dismounted to rest and eat, but within a few hours Averell received news that Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry was nearby at Fincastle and that Jones was between the Union troopers and Sweet Springs. At 9 p.m., the Federal commander reluctantly ordered the brigade to move out again, a detachment making another false advance toward Fincastle while the remainder of the brigade continued toward Sweet Springs.

Within a few hours the Federals ran into Jones' pickets and skirmished with them, driving the Confederates back 12 miles, beyond the junction of the Fincastle Pike and the road to Sweet Springs. Averell assessed the situation. Lee was very close to his right and rear, and he knew he could not get through Sweet Springs without a fight that his weary men might not be up to. Averell saw that he had only two choices: He could move back to the southwest, around Jones' right flank, through Monroe and Greenbrier counties, or he could move northeast to the Covington and Fincastle Pike. The former was the most circuitous route, while the latter was the most direct and therefore potentially dangerous. Averell chose the latter, rationalizing that the Confederates might not expect it.

The brigade moved forward once again, this time toward Covington, along a road described as a 'deep, narrow defile.' The roadbed was covered in ice, and horses repeatedly slipped and fell, slowing the advance. But Averell and his officers kept the command moving, and by midday on December 19 they were nearing Covington and the climax of the raid.

At noon on the 19th, Averell's brigade reached the Fincastle Pike, some 15 miles from the Island Ford Bridge across Jackson's River, five miles below Covington. Reports reached Averell that the river was unfordable and filled with ice floes–securing the span was the only option. The brigade quickly moved forward and, eight miles from the river, ran into a militia unit of 300 mounted men, which they pushed aside. Averell dispatched a force to closely pursue the militia and secure the bridge. What Averell did not know was that the span had already been prepared for burning as soon as the Confederates received word of the approaching Federal force. But his men moved too swiftly, reaching the bridge at a gallop and preventing its destruction. By 9 p.m. the four-mile-long main Federal column had reached the Island Ford Bridge and begun crossing.

Meanwhile, Jackson and a motley force of cavalry and militia tried to cut off Averell. The colonel had elected to move his men to the intersection of the Rich Patch and Covington roads. It was dark by the time he reached that point, and he soon discovered to his horror that Averell's force had taken a shortcut off the Rich Patch Road. Most of the Federal column had already crossed the bridge. Jackson sent Colonel William W. Arnett and his 20th Virginia Cavalry up the Rich Patch Road to pin down the end of the column while he led the rest of his men toward the bridge. A night engagement, a rare event in the Civil War, ensued.

By that time, all of Averell's brigade except the 14th Pennsylvania and some of the ambulances and supply wagons had crossed the bridge. Jackson's men arrived and cut off the bridge, and Arnett's men fell upon the 14th Pennsylvania, which continued to fight its way forward. But despite three attempts, the Federals could not reach the bridge. As morning approached, Averell sent word to the cut-off regiment to try to find another way across. He then set fire to the bridge to stop Jackson from following.

As the bridge burned, Colonel Arnett pulled back to prevent the 14th Pennsylvania from escaping via a nearby railroad bridge. This was a mistake. The besieged Federal cavalry instead took a pathway down into the river gorge and, despite the high, icy waters, managed to swim to the other side, losing four men who drowned. The regiment speedily rejoined the brigade and continued the journey back to Union lines.

A golden opportunity for the Confederates to stop Averell's escape had been squandered in a confusing and frustrating night engagement. This failure could be attributed to the difficulties of communicating in the dark and to the fact that most of the troops on both sides probably had never before fought in darkness. Still another reason might have been poor Confederate discipline. A report filed with Jones by Major Edward McMahon, a quartermaster who arrived in Covington shortly after the skirmish, indicated not only that he thought Colonel Jackson was negligent and incompetent in his preparations for Averell's arrival but also that the Confederate troops may have been more interested in pillaging than in stopping the Federals. He reported that townspeople told him 'the soldiers were running about plundering and gathering up property abandoned by the enemy.' Further, he alleged, 'almost every crime has been perpetrated by the command from burglary down to rape.' McMahon added, 'Unless you order an investigation of these matters, the people here will demand it from the War Department, as the whole community are in a state of great excitement, augmented no little by the many petty crimes, and increased at last to fever heat by the rape on a most respectable lady.' Not surprisingly, there was no mention of these incidents in either Jackson's or Jones' reports.

Although the Confederate threat was now gone, the travails of nature had not yet ended for Averell's beleaguered troopers. The waters in all the streams remained high, and the temperature unbearably low. During the final three days of the march, the roads, bemoaned Averell, had the consistency of 'a glacier' and were so slippery that the artillery had to be pulled by dismounted men. On Christmas Eve, supplies from Beverly reached the column and the soldiers ate their first real rations in more than eight days. They kept slowly moving forward, however, and on December 26 the brigade finally arrived in Beverly.

The raid had accomplished little of military value. According to Jones' report, the railroad was repaired in 'three or four days' and was actually improved by the resulting repairs. Apparently a few of the bridges burned had been in bad condition and their destruction provided a much-needed opportunity to replace them.

Averell reported losing seven men to drowning, seven wounded, one missing and 97 captured, most of them at the crossing near Covington. What his report could not reflect was that a staggering 71 of those 97 captured would eventually die in captivity, most at the notorious Confederate prison at Andersonville, Ga.

(Excerpted from the article written by Robert N. Thompson published in the November 2000 issue of America's Civil (republished here for educational purposes)).

22nd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (1st Kanawha Regiment) (Confederate)

Brief History

22nd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (1st Kanawha Regiment). Confederate service for this Regiment began in July 1861. Its Companies came from the counties of Jackson, Craig, Nicholas, Alleghany, Wyoming, and Boone. It was reorganized 1 May 1862. It was assigned to Echols' and Patton's Brigade, participated in the Shenandoah Valley operations, and disbanded during the spring of 1865. The field officers were Colonels George S. Patton and C.Q. Tompkins; Lieutenant Colonels Andrew R. Barbee, William A. Jackson, and John C. McDonald; and Majors Robert A. Bailey and Isaac N. Smith.

Companies in this Regiment with the Counties of Origin

Men often enlisted in a company recruited in the counties where they lived though not always. After many battles, companies might be combined because so many men were killed or wounded.

Company A ( Border Rifles) - many men from Putnam County

Company B (Mountain Cove Guards) - many men from Fayette County

Company C (Fayetteville Rifles) - many men from Fayette  County

Company D (Nicholas Blues) - many men from Nicholas County

Company E (Elk River Tigers) - many men from Kanawha County

Company F (Border Rifles) - many men from Jackson County

Company G (Rocky Point Grays) - many men from Monroe and Alleghany Counties.

Company H (Wyoming Riflemen) - many men from Wyoming County

Company  I  (Kanawha Riflemen) - many men from Kanawha County

Company  K (Boone Company) - many men from Boone County

The information above is from 22nd Virginia Infantry, by Terry D. Lowry.

26th Battalion, Virginia Infantry (Edgar's) (Confederate)

Brief History

The 26th Infantry Battalion was organized in May, 1862, with men of the 59th Regiment Virginia Infantry During April, 1865, it disbanded.  The field officers were Lieutenant Colonel George M. Edgar and Major Richard Woodram.

Companies in this Regiment with the Counties of Origin

Men often enlisted in a company recruited in the counties where they lived though not always. After many battles, companies might be combined because so many men were killed or wounded.

Company A (Red Sulphur Yankee Hunters) - many men from Monroe County

Company B (Captain Edmund Strudwick Read's Company)  - many men from Monroe and Greenbrier Counties

Company C (Captain Thomas W. Thompson's Company) - many men from Mercer County, West Virginia

Company D (Captain George Mathews Edgar's Company) (Originally Captain Fielding Fleshman's Company

Company E (Captain William D. Hefner's Company) Scouts and Guides) - many men from Greenbrier County

   The above information is from 26th Battalion Virginia Infantry, by Terry Lowry.

27th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)

Brief History

The 27th Virginia Volunteer Infantry Regiment was an infantry regiment comprising only eight companies. The regiment fought mostly with the Stonewall Brigade of the Army of Northern Virginia.

The regiment was organized in May, 1861, and accepted into Confederate service in July. The men were from the counties of Alleghany, Rockbridge, Monroe, Greenbrier, and Ohio. During the war it served under the command of General T.J. Jackson, R.B. Garnett, Winder, Paxton, J.A. Walker, and W. Terry.

Companies in this Regiment with the Counties of Origin

Men most often enlisted in a company recruited in their home county; however, later in the war, particularly after the conscription act, some companies might be combined.

Company A Light Infantry (Alleghany Roughs) - many men from Alleghany County

Company B (Virginia Hibernians)- many men from Alleghany County

Company C (Alleghany Rifles) - many men from Alleghany County

Company D (Monroe Guards) - many men from Monroe County

Company E (Greenbrier Rifles also Lewisburg Rifles)- many men from Rockbridge County

Company F ( Greenbrier Sharp Shooters)- many men from Greenbrier County.

Company G (Shriver Greys) - many men from Wheeling, Ohio County now West Virginia

Company H (1st) (Old Dominion Grays) - disbanded in June 1861

Company H (2nd) (Rockbridge Rifles) - many men from Rockbridge County.

The information above is from 27th Virginia Infantry, by Lowell Reidenbaugh.

Jesse Humphries' Claim

The United States

Claim of Jesse Humphries

Dec. 19th 1863

one Brown mare                                                  $200.00

one dun horse                                                      $150.00

Bay horse                                                              $200.00

Two saddles at $15 each                                     $30.00

Two check lines                                                       $4.00

300 lbs of pork at 12 ½ per lb                              $37.50

bushels Corn $1.50 per bushel                          $15.00

Balance                                                                   $636.50

 

To the commissioners of Claims for the United States:

Your petitioner respectfully states of his own knowledge, that he is a resident of the county of Alleghany & state of Virginia. That at the time stated, in the above bill, he was a resident of the county of Alleghany & state of Virginia; that during & throughout the late rebellion, at the time the above named property was taken & prior thereto, he was & remained, a loyal adherent to the cause & the government of the United States; that he did not voluntarily serve in the Confederate army or navy either as an officer, soldier, or sailor, or in any other capacity, at any time during the late rebellion; that he never voluntarily furnished any stores, supplies or other material aid to said Confederate army or navy, or to the confederate government, or to any officer, department, or adherent of the same, in support thereof, and that he never voluntarily accepted or exercised the functions of any office whatsoever under, or yielded voluntary support to the said confederate government; that he was the sole owner in his own right of the property above charged for, at the time it was taken; that no Mortgage, bill of sale or other lien of like nature then rested upon it or any part of it, that neither this claim nor any interest therein has ever been sold, given away, attached or taken in execution; that to the best of his knowledge and belief the United States have no legal offsets to the above bill except as therein stated; that he has never been paid for said property, or any part thereof, or heretofore made claim for pay for it, that to the best of his knowledge belief & intention he has made no charges in the above bill for property wantonly destroyed or stolen by troops; that the prices charged in the above Bill are believed to be as low as the Market rates, at the time & place; that the quality of each article taken was as follows, I make this Application under the Act of March the 3rd, 1871.

One Brown horse, Mare, good work & riding, one dun Horse good for work, one Bay horse sound & healthy, two saddles good, two lines, Corn good & sound, 300 lb pork good well fattened.

He further states of his own knowledge that said property was taken from him about the time stated in December the 19th 1863 at his farm in the Rich Patch, by the command of General Averill & the troops of his Army as they were at his place on a raid, the whole army passing by he has not been able to ascertain the particular troops that carried the property away it was carried with the Army. That no receipt or voucher Lr other memoranda of said seizure was given except as herein attached, & finally your petitioner prays that he may be awarded & paid the amount of the foregoing balance or so much thereof as may be deemed legally & justly due him.

Samuel Willard                                                                                   Jesse Humphries

Charles L Humphries

State of Virginia County of Alleghany to wit:

Jesse Humphries being duly sworn, deposes & says that he is the petitioner in the foregoing petition & who signed the same; that the matters herein stated are true of deponents own

DEPOSITIONS GIVEN FOR THE CLAIM OF JESSE HUMPHRIES.

 

BY CHARLES L. HUMPHRIES

 “I am 41 years old, a farmer, live in the Rich Patch where I was born and raised and have always lived except from March 27 to May 12th 1862 and from 14th of January 1864 to the close of the war when I was at work at Grays Furnace in Botetourt Co.”

“I am a son of Jesse Humphries and administrator of his Estate. He died in August 1871 after having divided his real estate among his children. He left no will, and I was appointed administrator by the county court of Alleghany Co. I have administered on the estate and this claim is now prosecuted for the benefit of the legal heirs of Jesse Humphries.”

“I was living where I now reside in the Rich Patch when the war began.”

“My sympathies were always with the Union, our family were all Union people. My father was an out and out Union man and all the children were of the same spirit from the beginning to the end of the war.”

“I have fed deserters and refugees when dodging about in the brush to avoid the conscript officers while I was at home having a Substitute in the Army or was at work at the furnace.”

“I was always in favor of maintaining the Union just as it was. After the State seceded it made no difference with me. My sympathies were always with the Union cause.”

“I was always glad when the Union forces were successful and rejoiced when the Confederate forces surrendered and the war was ended.”

“Jacob Tingler, William Humphries, George M. Jamison, Samuel Byer, Charles G. Persinger, George W Tingler, Charles Redman, Carper Persinger were all Union people living within 2 and 3 miles of the Rich Patch. John Crowder and Samuel Willard and my father and family also were Union people.”

“I was threaten with arrest by the Provost Marshal if I did not go to the Army and also by another Provost after I had sent a substitute when I was required to go also.”

“First I was called out in the Militia in March 1862 and was sent to Camp Buckner in Greenbrier Co. where I was kept about 5 weeks when I ran away and went home. When home about 6 weeks I was notified by the Provost Marshal to report at Covington on a certain day. I did not go there and he sent me another notice if I did not report he would have me arrested. I then went to Covington, was examined by the surgeon and given a furlough from time to time until the 7th of Nov. 1862 when I was required to go to the Army and finding I could escape no longer I hired a substitute for the war and paid him $1,500 which released me until the 14th of January 1864 at which time I was required to either go to the Army or do something else. Finding there was no escape for me I went to the furnace and got detailed to work at chopping wood and at getting out iron oar to be smelted at the furnace until the war closed.”

Question #36 – Had you any near relatives in the Confederate army, or in any military or naval service hostile to the United States? “None nearer than cousins, except a brother-in-law married Stull who ran away.”

“Yes, I took the amnesty oath at Covington after the war. I thought it my duty to do so and I did it voluntarily and cheerfully.”

“I did not vote in any of those questions nor on any questions during the war. I was quite sure that my father and all our family stayed at home when the vote was taken to ratify secessions.”

“I saw the brown mare in possession of General Averill’s forces and I saw them taking the corn from a pile lying in front of my door. I think they took from the pile 30 to 40 bushels. Some of it was thrown into wagons as they passed and some was fed out on the place a short time.”

 

BY EUNICE HUMPHRIES

“I am 69 years old. I live in what is called the Rich Patch about 10 miles from Covington Alleghany Co. where we have lived over 30 years.”

“My husband was born and raised in this county.”

“My husband and all our family were all strong Union people from the beginning to the end of the war.”

“I don’t know of anything that any of our family ever did against the Union cause.

“We were willing and did do all we could to aid the Union cause. We harbored deserters and refugees, fed and concealed them various times. Harvey Humphries, Morton Humphries, William Fridley, Richard Fridley, Charles K. Humphries were some of the persons aided. My husband carried provisions to them in the brush.”

Question #9 – Had you any near relatives in the Union army or navy? “Yes, I had a brother and I don’t know how many nephews in the Union Army. My brothers name was Roland Simmons, he lived in Kentucky. I don’t know the regiments they were in.”

“He (Jesse) always adhered to the Union side, he was greatly opposed to secession and talked against it a great deal.”

We always wanted the Union forces to succeed and was greatly rejoiced at the final surrender of the Confederate forces.”

Question #15 – What favors, privileges, or protections were ever granted you in recognition of your loyalty during the war, and when and by whom granted?  “We were told our property should be protected by one of the Union officers and a guard was sent to our house.”

“Richard Fridley, William Humphries, George P. King, Jesse Humphries and his children William Allen, Logan S. & Charles L Humphries and Anna Persinger and her sons Charles A. and John Persinger were all Union people.”

“I don’t know about the threats. My husband was arrested in December 1864 and carried to Wythe county together with William Persinger, Zebedee Persinger and Harrison Quickel. My husband was charged with harboring and encouraging deserters and refugees. I don’t know how he obtained his release.”

Question #20 – Was any of your property taken by Confederate officer or soldiers, or any rebel authority? Yes, they took 3 horses, 3 head of cattle, a large quantity hay, fodder, & corn and used large quantity of lumber from his mill and other property. They never paid for anything.”

“We had three sons who were drafted and were sent to Camp Buckner and were kept there about a month. When the troops collected they were being sent east, one of my sons ran away and came home and the other was sick and my husband started for him and met him on the way home and he died in ten days. The other one hired a substitute his name is Charles L Humphries.

“His (Jesse) farm contains over 1,100 acres.”

“I am the widow of Jesse Humphries who died in 1871. He was a loyal man during the war, if there was any loyal man anywhere.”

“We have six children who are heirs to his estate. He divided his property among his children before he died. His claim is prosecuted for the benefit of his legal heirs. The names of our children are William, Logan S., Charles L., Almira V., Janette C., & Hugh P. Humphries. All except Hugh P. and Janette C. were of age when the property was taken.”

“I was at home when the property was taken and saw the meat and the saddles taken.”

“The saddles were taken at one and the same time from the porch of our house where they were hanging.”

“They were taken late in the evening of same day of December 1863. It was the 19th or 21st I think, while General Averills Army was passing our place going towards Covington. They were men saddles, one was nearly new and the other pretty good. I don’t know their value.”

“The pork was some we had just salted down in a large box. It was taken form our meat house in the yard. It was carried away in a wagon. I saw the men carry the pork to the wagon on their back. I don’t know the quantity taken.”

 

BY SAMUEL WILLARD

“I am 46 years old, a farmer, live in the Rich Patch where I have resided since 1852.”

“I am a son-in-law of the claimant. I married his daughter Almira E. Humphries and have a beneficial interest in this claim.”

“I have known the claimant and all his family intimately since 1853, have lived in the family all the time except when absent during about 2 years of the war when I was engaged in the service of the United States as Scout and teamster with General Averill’s command.”

“I have heard Jesse Humphries and all his family talk about war matters a hundred times. They were all strong Union people. They talked a great deal against secession. I am quite sure none of them went to the polls when the vote was taken to ratify secession. It was given out that any who did not vote for secession would be killed. The claimant voted for the Union delegate to the convention. I am positive of that for I was with him when he did it. I don’t know whether the boys voted at that time or not. I know they were for the Union.”

“Claimant and family aided persons who were trying to keep out of the army by harboring and feeding refugees and deserters from the army and giving them notice when the rebel scouts came around and encouraged to keep his own sons out of the army. On one occasion when the rebels were trying to get up volunteers, his son Joseph who is dead was prevailed on to go and volunteer, which when Jesse Humphries his father heard of, he went to the place of rendezvous at George Stull’s expressly to prevent Joseph from volunteering and when he was about to sign the roll, his father took him by the arm and led him away twice telling him not to do so and insisting on it, and he finally went away without volunteering. In the consequence of this, the officer who was getting up the confederacy talked very rough to the old man and told him he was not willing to do anything for his country. He replied by saying he did not mean to do anything against his country if he could help it. On another occasion he got one to run ??? ??? to inform a rebel deserter of the approach of the rebel Scouts.”

“He (Jesse) was generally well known as a Union man and all his family were known as Union people. His place was called by the name of Lincolnville by the South He was so well known as a union man that the rebels came and took his property without paying him for it or offering pay. They took him also and put him in Covington jail for a while and sent him to Dublin Depot in Wythe Co as a political prisoner. I have heard claimant and all his family spoken of as Union people all through the war and ever since.”

Question #61 – Who were the known and prominent Union people of the neighborhood during the war, and do you know that such persons could testify to the claimant’s loyalty? Jesse Humphries and family, Isaac & Richard Fridley, Almira Persinger and family, William Humphries & family, Jacob Tingler, Nash Persinger and others who are either dead or moved away were Union people.”

“I was a Union man from the first to the last and all the family and neighbors knew it. They knew it from my conversations and my actions. I always spoke in favor of the Union cause. When General Averill was on his retreat from Salem I joined his company and went with them as pilot through the mountains about here and went on to West Virginia.”

“They took his (Jesse) property and arrested him simply because he was a Union man and assisted the Union cause, harbored deserters too.”

“He was a member of the M.E. (Methodist Episcopal) Church North and in consequence was despised and marked as a radical and Lincolnite.”

“When General Averill’s Army arrived at Beverly in Randolph County (WV) on the way to Grafton, I saw all three of the horses of the claimant in the camps. Two of them were in the 10th WV Regiment and one in the 14 Pennsylvania. One was a small brown mare, about 4 or 5 years old. Claimant paid $150 for her just before the war I think. One was a large dun horse about 10 years old, he was worth $150 to $175. One was a large bay horse about 5 or 6 years old, he was worth about $175 good money.”

 

BY NANCY PERSINGER

“I am 54 years old, I live in the Rich Patch adjoining the farm of the claimant where I have resided about 40 years.

“I am not related to the claimant and have no interest in the success of this claim.”

“I have known the claimant for 40 years, have lived within ¼ a mile of him all the time. Saw him nearly every day during the war except when he was carried away by the rebels. Our families used frequently to visit each other.”

“I have talked with and heard him talk hundreds of times on subjects relative to the war, secession etc and he always expressed union sentiments. He spoke very strongly and decidedly against secession and the rebellion. My husband was then living and was decided Union man. He and claimant used often to get together and talk over matters. I can’t repeat any language, but they both agreed in support of the Union and in condemning the Confederacy and Secession.”

“He (Jesse) was generally and well known as a Union man. I have heard him so spoken of by both Union people and the South. He was arrested and taken off somewhere for about 6 weeks one time for being a Union man.”

Question #61 – Who were the known and prominent Union people of the neighborhood during the war, and do you know that such persons could testify to the claimant’s loyalty?  - “Jesse Humphries, Isaac Fridley, George P. King, William Humphries and some others who now dead were Union people living near claimant. Fridley and King are dead also.”

“I certainly was for the Union but many times I dare not open my mouth when in company of the South.”

“I have heard him condemn the Confederacy and all that the South were doing. He said it would be the ruination of the country to secede and to and go to war with the North. I am sure he did not vote for secession from his talk on the subject with my husband.”

 

BY GEORGE M. TINGLER

“I am 31 years old, a farmer, live in the Rich Patch where I was born and raised and have always lived except from September 1863 until the close of the war.”

“I am not related to the claimant and have no interest in the success of this claim.”

“I have known the claimant and his family all my life. I have lived about 1 ½ miles from them most of the time. Saw them very frequently during the war until I went away to West VA.”

“I worked for the claimant several months during the war probably 5 or 6. I often heard him talk about war matters. He was a decided Union man. All his expressions were in favor of the Union cause. He would hold up that side always when talking of such matters. I remember hearing a pretty severe controversy between him and Kilbrith Kile a noted secessionist at one time when coming from Covington when claimant stoutly maintained the cause of the Union. I have heard him talk the same way since the war. When I was at work for him, his sons that were at home were of the same mind with claimant.”

“He (Jesse) was well known as a Union man by all who knew him at all. I have heard him spoken of as a Union man by both South and Union people. The family were so well known as Union people that the place was stigmatized as Lincolnville by the South.”

Question #61 – Who were the known and prominent Union people of the neighborhood during the war, and do you know that such persons could testify to the claimant’s loyalty? – Richard Fridley, William Humphries, Jesse Humphries and family, Samuel Willard, Jacob Tingler my father and others some of whom are now dead were all Union people within one to two miles of claimant.”

“I always held for the Union. I was pressed into the Army at 18 and ran away and went to West VA and stayed until the war closed.”

“I heard he (Jesse) was much abused and badly treated after I went to West VA.”

  

BY LOGAN S. HUMPHRIES

“I am 46 years old, a farmer, and live in the Rich Patch where I was born and raised.”

“I am one of the sons of Jesse Humphries, the claimant and have an interest in this claim.”

“I was living on claimant’s farm. I was a Union man from the beginning to the end of the war and all our family were also. We were all opposed to slavery before the war and had no sympathy with the war.”

“I fed deserters and refugees trying to escape service in the rebel army. I was keeping house there. I was married before the war. Some were neighbor’s boys who told me they had left the army and some were strangers I never saw before nor since.”

Question #9 – Had you any near relatives in the Union army or navy? “I had some cousins in the Union army form West Virginia. I don’t know positively but I think some were in the 10th WV calvary.”

“I took the side of the Union and spoke against secession. I told the people if Virginia seceded, it would be sure to bring on a war. And we should be united. I told them if the South should gain her independence the common or laboring people of the county would not be so much respected as a negro. I told them if Buchannan had done his duty he would have sent a force into S. Carolina and whipped her back at once. After the state seceded it made no difference with me.”

“I was always sorry when the Union army was defeated and glad when they were victorious. We were all rejoiced when we heard of the surrender of General Lee and the confederate forces.”

“My father and all his family, William Humphries and family, Amira Persinger and family, Isaac & Richard Fridley, Samuel Willard, Jacob Tingler and others were Union people living within 2 to 3 ½ miles of the Rich Patch.”

“I heard of threats of arrest and imprisonment for having been privy to my sister carrying an auger to a prisoner in jail at Covington to enable him to escape. The prisoner was a Union man.”

“I was drafted, or rather I was sent with the militia to Camp Buckner in Greenbrier Co on the 27th March 1862 and was discharged in 14 days by the Medical board and came home and remained home during the whole period of the war.”

Question #35 – Did you ever receive a pass from rebel authority? – “I received on once when I went to Covington for some salt. I had to get one from the Provost Marshal to go home. That was all I ever had a pass for.”

“I had an uncle who was killed in the Confederate army and perhaps some cousins who were a short time in the militia and soon ran away.”

“I took the amnesty oath at Covington after the war. There was a general notice given for all persons to come and take it and I went with the rest.”

“I have no recollection of voting at any time after the election of Lincoln. I was not at the polls when the vote was taken to ratify secession.”

 

BY WILLIAM A. HUMPHRIES

“I am 47 years old, a farmer, live in the Rich Patch where I was born and raised and have always lived except about 3 years in the West.”

“I am the oldest son of Jesse Humphries and have an interest in the success of this claim.”

“I was living where I now do when the war began.”

“Well sir, so far as my sympathies were concerned, they were with the State though I did not go into the war. I got a detail and worked at the furnace in Botetourt County.”

“I was willing to do anything I could safely do. I had no opportunity to do anything while in Virginia.”

“I was employed on a Government wharf boat at Galeopolise (Gallipolis), Ohio about two months.”

“I did not favor secession. I tried to remain neutral.”

“I felt that my interests were here and my sympathies were with the State.”

“I can’t say that I rejoiced much over the news of the Confederate victory at Manassas and at other places but I confess I was glad when the Confederates surrendered and the war was ended. I felt then that I would not have to move.”

“I don’t know that I could tell you there were some living near here that I considered Union men. I think John C. Smith, Isaac Wolf, William Humphries, Samuel Byer, Samuel Willard and some others beside my father and brothers were Union men.”

“I worked the furnace in order to keep out of the Army. I had to do one or the other or go north.”

Question #23 – What force, compulsion, or influence, was used to make you do anything against the Union cause? – “The power of the Confederate government.”

“I was conscripted and taken out a few days before I got detailed.”

“I had a brother who was conscripted and died while in the service while at home.”

“I was taken from my home by General Averill’s forces and was sent to Camp Chase where I stayed between 4 & 5 months when I was released on taking the oath of Allegiance to the States.”

“I have no recollection of voting on any questions during the war or on the question of secession.”

“I don’t remember seeing any of the property taken. On the way to Ohio when in Randolph county, I recollect seeing the dun horse in possession of General Averill’s forces and I think I saw the bay horse also with them. I think they were in possession of the 14th Pennsylvania Calvary. They were both large good horses and in very good order. I can’t tell what they were worth then.”

 

BY ALMIRA V. WILLARD

“I am 39 years old, I live in the Rich Patch on the place where I was born and raised and have lived all my life except while in Ohio during part of the war.”

“I am a daughter of the claimant and have an interest in this claim.”

“I was always a Union woman from first to last.”

“I was willing and did aid those desiring to escape service in the Confederate Army. I helped to prepare food for deserters and refugees many times.”

“I have an uncle and some cousins in the Union Army, I heard so at least, they lived in Kentucky. Their names were Simmons.”

“I always adhered to the Union cause. I thought secession was a mighty wrong thing. My father talked a great deal against secession.”

“I felt very bad about Manassas battle. I was glad when the Union forces were successful and rejoiced when the war was ended and the Confederates surrendered.”

Question #15 – What favors, privileges, or protections were ever granted you in recognition of your loyalty during the war, and when and by whom granted? I never sought any, but when I and my husband went west we were furnished with transportation.”

Question #20 – Was any of your property taken by Confederate officers or soldiers, or any rebel authority? “Yes, they took two horses, a quantity of corn and bacon and other things. They never paid us anything.”

“I have several uncles and cousins in the Confederate service. One uncle was killed and one went to the Yankees. They were both living in this county. I believe they were both in the 22 VA Infantry, one was an officer. Their names were William A. Simmons and James Simmons. They were brothers of Roland Simmons who was in the Yankee Army.”

William Humphries' Claim

The United States

Claim of William Humphries

Dec. 19th, 1863

one Black horse                                                 $200.00

one Saddle                                                             $15.00

one Bridle                                                                 $2.50

Balance                                                                 $217.50

 

To the commissioners of Claims for the United States:

Your petitioner respectfully states of his own knowledge, that he is a resident of the county of Alleghany & state of Virginia. That at the time stated, in the above bill, he was a resident of the county of Alleghany & state of Virginia; that during & throughout the late rebellion, at the time the above named property was taken & prior thereto, he was & remained, a loyal adherent to the cause & the government of the United States; that he did not voluntarily serve in the Army of the Confederacy, as many, either as an officer soldier, or sailor, or in any other capacity, at any time during the late rebellion; that he never voluntarily furnished any stores, supplies or other material aid to said Confederate army or navy, or to the confederate government, or to any officer, department, or adherent of the same, in support thereof, and that he never voluntarily accepted or exercised the functions of any office whatsoever, under, or yielded voluntary support to the said confederate government; that he was the sole owner, in his own right of the property above charged for, at the time it was taken; that no Mortgage, bill of sale or other lien of like nature then rested upon it or any part of it, that neither this claim nor any interest therein has ever been sold, given away, attached or taken in execution; that to the best of his knowledge and belief the United States have no legal offsets to the above bill except as therein stated; that he has never been paid for said property, or any part thereof, or heretofore made claim for it, for pay, thereof; that to the best of his knowledge belief & intention he has made no charges in the above bill for property wantonly destroyed or stolen by troops; that the prices charged in the above Bill are believed to be as low as the Market rates, at the time & place; that the quality of each article taken was as follows, I make this Application under the Act of the 3rd of March 1871.

The horse was black in color good work horse. The saddle was a good serviceable one, the bridle good.

He further states of his own knowledge that said property was taken from him about the time stated above, in December 1863, at or near his own place in the Rich Patch, by the troops under the command of General Averill, I had o means of knowing the regiment, in which the property was taken as the whole Army was passing along on a raid.

The horse was taken way, in the army, that no receipt or voucher memoranda of said seizure was given except as herein attached, & finally your petitioner prays that he may be awarded & paid the amount of the foregoing balance or so much thereof as may be deemed legally & justly due him.

George M. Jamison                                                                                William Humphries

Charles K Humphries

State of Virginia County of Alleghany to wit:

William Humphries being duly sworn, deposes & says that he is the petitioner in the foregoing petition & who signed the same; that the matters herein stated are true of deponents own knowledge, except as to those matters which are stated, on information & belief & as to those matters, he believes them to be true; that he hereby constitutes & appoints Lewis T Mann of Alleghany County VA his Lawful Attorney, with power of substitution & association, to prosecute this Claim & receive a draft payable to the petitioners order for the amount allowed therein.

George M. Jamison                                                                                William Humphries

Charles K Humphries

Sworn to, acknowledged & subscribed, before me this 5th day of May 1871. And I certify that I am not interested in this Claim or its prosecution.

Sampson Humphries            J P (Justice of the Peace) seal

 

 

 The witnesses relied on to prove loyalty are; Harvey Humphries, Jesse Humphries, Charles K Humphries, Granville Fridley, George M Jamison, William A Humphries, Nancy Humphries.

 

Depositions given 6th May, 1871

 

Question – State what you know, in relation to the Army of the United States under the command of General Averill taken for Army purposes the property of William Humphries.

 

Harvey Humphries - “After the horse of William Humphries was taken, I saw the horse in the command of General Averill, at different times, used as an Army horse.”

Jesse Humphries – “I know William Humphries had his horse before the Army passed by & after the Army was gone by, the horse was gone also.”

Granville Fridley – “I know William Humphries started away on his horse on the same day the Army of General Averill passed by the road he went, he came back without the horse & said the Army took his horse.”

George M Jamison – “I saw the horse of William Humphries after he was taken by the Army of the United States, in the command of General Averill in the possession of the troops used as an Army horse. I saw the horse at least in the Army twice.

William A Humphries – “I saw the black horse of William Humphries in the United States Army under the command of General Averill after he was taken by the Army, in the Army used as an Army horse, The same Army passed near Humphries’ place.”

 

Question – State what you know, also as regards his loyalty to the United States government.

 

Harvey Humphries – “…he was a loyal man to the United States government, took no part in the war, gave no aid to it, was opposed to the war, remained a quiet citizen.”

Jesse Humphries – “I know William Humphries was a loyal man to the government of the United States, took no part in the war, gave no aid to it, was opposed to the same.”

Charles K Humphries – “I know William Humphries was a loyal man to the United States government throughout and during the war, he was opposed to the war, took no part in it, gave no aid to it, was a Union man.”

Granville Fridley – “He was a loyal man to the United States government, was opposed to the war throughout, took no part in it, gave no aid to it, was a Union man.”

George M Jamison – “Mr. William Humphries was a Union man, he gave no aid in the war, was opposed to it.”

William A Humphries – “”…he was a loyal man to the United States throughout the war, gave no aid to it, took no part in the war was a consistent Union man.”

Nancy Humphries – “I know William Humphries was a Union man, at the beginning & throughout the war, was against the war, took no part in it, was loyal to the United States government.”

 

Sampson Humphries JP (Justice of the Peace) seal

DEPOSITIONS GIVEN FOR THE CLAIM OF WILLIAM HUMPHRIES.

 

BY WILLIAM HUMPHRIES

“I am 78 years old, a farmer, live in the Rich Patch Alleghany Co., VA near where I was born and raised and have always lived.”

“I sympathized with the Union cause all the time from first to last.”

“I fed deserters and refugees and on one occasion I came across a Union soldier who had lost his command and took him to the house and fed him.”

“I was on the Union side. I talked against secession when they were threatening those that would not vote for it.”

“I was always sorry for the defeat of the Union forces and was right glad when they were successful. I was mighty glad when the war was over and the rebellion suppressed.”

Question #15 – What favors, privileges, or protections were ever granted you in recognition of your loyalty during the war, and when and by whom granted? “I was not in need of any. The Union forces never came near my place, I live in the mountain range.”

“I think Jesse Humphries and his sons Charles L. and Logan S. Humphries, Samuel Willard, Samuel Byer, Almira Persinger’s sons John and Charles were all Union people.”

“The Confederate Guard threatened to arrest and carry me to Covington for supporting Union men and measures. They came one night and threatened to handcuff me and said my house would be burned and my property destroyed if I did not do different.”

“I had 4 sons who were ordered out in the Militia and were sent to Camp Buckner in Greenbrier Co. In a few weeks they all ran away one went through the lines and some of the others started but was unable to get through and stayed around home hiding in the bushes & in the mountains where they were supplied with provisions by the family until the war ended. None of them ever went to the Army. It was for harboring them and keeping them from the Army that I was threatened by the Guards with arrest.”

“I did not vote on any questions during the war. I did not vote on the question relating to secession. I did not go to the poll. I would not vote for it and it was dangerous to offer to vote against it.”

“The horse saddle and bridle were taken from me by the Army of General Averill in Dec. 1863. I was going to mill and met them in the road. The Army was going towards Covington. There was no one with me when my horse was taken. He was about 8 or 9 years old and a pretty good horse. The saddle & bridle were about half new. I scarcely know what they were all worth. My brother valued my horse at about $200.”

 

BY RUTH HUMPHRIES

“I am 74 years old, I am the wife of the claimant and live with him. I have heard him talk hundreds of times against secession and the war he was bitterly opposed to it and would not vote for secession when nearly everybody was afraid not to. He was always a strong Union man and would stand up for it at all times. I have heard him speak in favor of it hundreds of times. He had no sympathy with the war and did not want the boys to go into it and wanted to keep them out.”

“He used to encourage and feed deserters and refugees and kept our boys around in the bushes and in the mountain and fed them there to keep them from the Army. They were once sent to Camp Buckner but soon ran away and on went through the lines.”

“I think everybody who knew him (William) at all must have known he was a Union man for he would talk Union.”

“Old Jesse Humphries and his sons Charles and Logan, Samuel Willard, Samuel Byer, Almira Persinger and her sons were all Union people.”

“I was a Union woman. The Guards threatened to arrest me for it once and talked very rough to me”

Question #63 – Do you know of any threats, molestations, or injury inflicted upon the claimant, or his family, or his property, on account of his adherence to the Union case? “Yes, the Rebel Guards were going to carry my husband to Covington and they threatened to arrest me too and said our property would be burnt if we didn’t do different. This was while we were concealing our boys in the mountain. If they could have caught them I reckon they would have killed them, they were so angry.”

“In December 1863 my husband started to go to mill after a grist which was there. He went away riding the only horse we had and returned without any saying the Army of General Averill had taken the horse, saddle, and bridle from him.”

 

BY NANCY M. HUMPHRIES

“I am 45 years old. I am a daughter-in-law of the claimant and live in the same house with the claimant. I have lived on the place about 16 years.

“I have heard him talk about secession and the war a great many times. He was strongly opposed to secession and the rebellion and always spoke against it and in favor of the Union cause.”

“He used to be very friendly with Union men and refugees and fed deserters and kept his sons concealed in the bushes and in the mountains a long time while the Guards were after them.”

“He was well known in the neighborhood as a Union man. I have heard him have controversies with Joseph Irwin a strong south neighbor and they never could agree. Claimant would always stand for the Union and was opposed to the course of the Confederates and to secession.”

“Jesse Humphries and his sons Charles and Logan and Samuel Willard, Samuel Byer and Almira Persinger and her sons were all Union people.”

“I was a Union woman.”

Question #63 – Do you know of any threats, molestations, or injury inflicted upon the claimant, or his family, or his property, on account of his adherence to the Union case? “Yes, the Rebel Guards have threatened to carry claimant and his wife and me too off to Covington if we did not tell where the boys were. They would come in the night and threatened to burn our chairs if we didn’t give them a light so they could search the house for the boys. They came at different time day and night while the boys were dodging. They charged us all with harboring deserters and threatened to take us all away. The house of claimant is situated at the foot of a densely wooded large mountain very convenient for dodgers of the Army.”

 

BY JOHN PERSINGER

“I am 33 years old a farmer, live in the Rich Patch about 2 miles from the claimant.”

“I am not related to the claimant and have no interest in the success of this claim.”

“I have known him all my life, was raised near him, often met him during the war. Have heard him speak in favor of the Union cause and against secession and the rebellion scores of  times. He was always a decided Union man.”

“He used to feed and harbor deserters and refugees and would conceal them from the Rebel Guards and would do all he could to aid them. I have seen him feed them many times and have been supplied by him with food while I was dodging before I  went through the lines.”

“I was a Union man.”

 

BY WILLIAM A. HUMPHRIES

“I am 47 years old, a farmer, live in the Rich Patch and about ¾ of a mile from the claimant.”

“He is my uncle. I have no interest in the success of this claim.”

“I was not present at the taking of the property. I was taken by General Averill’s forces in December 1863 when they were returning from Salem a little before Christmas and carried to Ohio. While on the way I saw several times the horse of  claimants in possession of General Averill’s forces and in the service of the United States one of the soldiers riding him each time I saw him. He was a very dark brown or black horse about 15 hands high, in good order and fine style. I don’t know his age nor his value at that time. He would probably sell now for about $100. I don’t know anything about the saddle or bridle.”

Please contact us with any questions.

bryan@richpatch-humphries.com

greg@defendingthefaithnow.org

Click HERE to visit Descendants of John Humphries Facebook Page

Click HERE to visit Persinger-Craft-Tucker Family Facebook Page

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Humphries
10 Croyden Lane
Staunton, VA 24401
Phone: 540.885.7333